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“Kind thoughts transcend space and time. . . . No matter where people are in life, kindness makes them celebrate together.” ~out of “The Healing Power of Kindness,” by Jean Maalouf

Unity Blog

 
Peace is Letting Go of Resentment.

December 7, 2017

 

In the thick of the holiday season and the scramble before the end of another year, it can be difficult to connect with Peace. And yet isn’t that really what it’s all about?

 

 

Anthony de Mello asked, “How can I impart the gift of peace and love to others, if my own heart is still unloving, and I don’t have peace of mind myself?”

 

 

How can we sing about “peace on earth, good will to all,” if we ourselves are in a state of agitation and frantic confusion?

 

 

I come back over and over to the powerful practice of silence. When I become quiet, I enter into a profound and mysterious place. One of the Psalms says, “Deep calls unto deep.” The depths are found in the realm of spiritual silence.

 

 

In silence, I learn true perspective. I learn that it is possible to release fear. I learn how it feels to let go of resentment.

 

 

Resentment is hell. Letting go is heaven.

 

 

Richard Rohr says, “The ego loves something it can take sides on. True interior silence really does not allow you to take sides.”

 

 

In silence I learn. In silence I reconnect with my true self. In silence I release. In silence I find “peace that passes all understanding.”

 

 

As you live your life during these holiday weeks, whatever your circumstances, I sincerely hope that you can take time out for silence and that you can spend time in the realm of deep peace.

 

 

Be at peace.

 

 

Be peace.

 

 

With love,

Peggy

 

 

 

 

Peggy Christiansen is the Spiritual Leader at Unity of Fort Collins. She has over 25 years of ministry experience working with diverse populations, a M.Div. from San Francisco Theological Seminary, and a special interest in helping people find and/or develop their unique spiritual paths. Listen to podcasts of her Sunday talks.

Doing the Next Good Thing.

November 30, 2017

 
This Sunday we are blessed to have Kirsten Bolton share her incredible journey leading up to the award of a Habitat for Humanity home. Her story is filled with faith and light, trust and persistence, synchronicity and hope. Kirsten and her daughter Evalyn have been lights in our Unity community for a long time; we have been gifted many times, too, with Kirsten’s heartfelt music-sharing. Sunday she will speak about some of her recent spiritual life lessons.

 

 

In addition, we will light the 1st candle in the Advent Wreath, the Candle of Hope; the Unity band will do “Our House” and “Lean on Me”; and Kristi Nay will sing Martina McBride’s song, “Anyway.”

 

 

It is going to be another wonderful and soul-nurturing Sunday!

 

 

In love,

Peggy

 

 

Quote for Reflection:

“Hope can be learned with practice. Certain attitudes support it. One is patience, an ability to tolerate delays, a willingness to let events unfold in their own time. The other is courage, an attitude of confidence even when facing the unknown. A third is persistence, the determination to keep going no matter what happens. We have hope when we can say, all will be well,
and we mean it.”  (spiritualityandpractice.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Christiansen is the Spiritual Leader at Unity of Fort Collins. She has over 25 years of ministry experience working with diverse populations, a M.Div. from San Francisco Theological Seminary, and a special interest in helping people find and/or develop their unique spiritual paths. Listen to podcasts of her Sunday talks.

Blessings.

November 22, 2017

 

Before I go into what my topic is for Sunday, I want to share my gratitude for our Unity family. You continue to teach me so many things and to hold me with such fierce tenderness, just as you do each other.

 

Your willingness to step up when someone needs help and your willingness to reach out for support when you need it make me so glad to be in this adventure with you! I love the ways we are all growing. I treasure the Light that radiates in and out of this place. I cherish the laughter, the tears, and the heartfelt hugs. Thank you! Thank you for who you are and for keeping this beautiful space alive in the world!

 

My talk this Sunday will be about the practice of Blessing: an ancient, multi-cultural, spiritual act that is practiced in every faith tradition. I give you these beautiful words from Rachel Naomi Remen:

“Bless anything that shows you wisdom. Anything that shows you wisdom has become a part of who you are and has drawn you closer to life. The Tibetans have reverence for those who have passed along to them the priceless gift of the wisdom to live well. Perhaps this means having reverence for all of life, the ant and the hawk, the enemy and the friend, the lover and the parent and the child. All have offered us the opportunity to know ourselves and to know life. The chance to befriend life. This is true of our wins and losses, our illnesses, our celebrations, our joys and sorrows. All offer us wisdom. Bless them all.”

 

Bless you!

 

In love,

Peggy

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Christiansen is the Spiritual Leader at Unity of Fort Collins. She has over 25 years of ministry experience working with diverse populations, a M.Div. from San Francisco Theological Seminary, and a special interest in helping people find and/or develop their unique spiritual paths. Listen to podcasts of her Sunday talks.

Boxes.

November 16, 2017


I was having a conversation with a Unity person recently about the way we often put people—including ourselves—into boxes. I told him I have been thinking about this theme since January. (I actually wrote “letting go of boxes” down on my intention slip at the Burning Bowl ceremony.)

 

My Unity friend told me that one of his favorite Johnsmith songs is, “Don’t Put Me in a Box.” When I listened to it later, all I could say was, “YES! That’s IT!”

 

I am very excited that Johnsmith will be back this Sunday to do music at Unity, and I am hoping that he will sing that song for us.

 

There are so many ways that we put each other in boxes. It is particularly noticeable right now in the political climate of our country. But it is nothing new. Boxes seem to make life feel more manageable, like we have more control over things we don’t really understand. If we can just find a label, then it’s not necessary to go deeper. We can dismiss what we don’t understand or the parts of ourselves we don’t like. I think we even try to box up Spirit! Now that’s kind of funny, isn’t it?

Except it’s also kind of sad.

 

See you Sunday!

 

Love,
Peggy

 

 
Quote to ponder:

We do a lot of looking: we look through lenses, telescopes, television tubes . . . Our looking is perfected every day — but we see less and less. Never has it been more urgent to speak of seeing . . . we are on-lookers, spectators . . . “subjects” we are, that look at “objects.” Quickly we stick labels on all that is, labels that stick once — and for all. By these labels we recognize everything but no longer see anything.

— Frederick Franck 

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Christiansen is the Spiritual Leader at Unity of Fort Collins. She has over 25 years of ministry experience working with diverse populations, a M.Div. from San Francisco Theological Seminary, and a special interest in helping people find and/or develop their unique spiritual paths. Listen to podcasts of her Sunday talks.

On Giving and Receiving.

November 9, 2017

 

As we enter the “season of giving,” I begin to think about the relationship between giving and receiving. And I think they are both necessary practices in the flow of life’s abundance.

 

I have been present in a number of situations where comfortably well-off people have been eager to help the “less fortunate.” I have also seen numerous examples of people who had very little who wanted to give something to those who had plenty.

 

In those situations, I have watched the “haves” refuse gifts from the “have-nots,” because it “doesn’t feel right.” And I have seen people (and been one myself!) who have a hard time receiving, in general, and would much rather always be the giver – whether it be giving materially, giving care, or otherwise.

 

Yet Archbishop Helder Camera said, “No one is so poor that they cannot give, nor so rich that they cannot receive.”

 

Being willing to receive from others offers them dignity and worth, no matter their life circumstances. It creates an environment of healthy community and reciprocal relationships. It keeps abundance flowing. When we receive, we give a gift to the giver:  The gift of allowing them to help us, to give to us, to be needed.

 

Lama Surya Das says, “It’s often just as important to receive with an open heart as it is to give.” I invite you to join us this Sunday, as we explore the topic of giving and receiving.

 

Much love and deep gratitude,

Peggy